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Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto’s Kimono Culture

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Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kimonos in Nishiki Market

Kimonos in Nishiki Market, photo credit: Mr. Misadventures

Until my trip to Kyoto and Osaka, my only visits to Japan had been to Tokyo. During my many visits over the years, I had seen women wearing kimonos but really had no idea about the traditional garment, other than how beautiful it is. I saw so many people wearing a kimono in Kyoto, it was such a visual delight everywhere we went!

While researching for my trip to Kyoto I learned that the city was the ancient capital of Japan. Also, that Kyoto has hundreds of temples and shrines, which served as Japan’s main seat of government from the 8th to 17th centuries. People such as the emperor and his family, shoguns, priests, and politicians required beautiful clothing and Kyoto, therefore, became a major center for the textile industry, and by default the center for kimonos.

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kimonos on the Street in Kyoto

Kimonos on the Street in Kyoto, photo credit: Mr. Misadventures

Currently in most of Japan, kimonos are mainly worn for special occasions such as official holidays, however, Kyoto remains one of the few cities where people wearing a kimono can still be seen frequently. However, after discussing the topic with Gavin (our docent from our Kennin-ji Temple tour) its seems that kimono-wearing is very much in decline in Kyoto. The world is changing, with Starbucks and anime; and Kyoto’s own “millennials” see fewer opportunities to wear kimonos.

So what to do?

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Girl in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto

Girl in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto, photo credit: Mr. Misadventures

In order to safeguard the traditional industries and retain the artistry involved in this cultural icon as well as to promote Kyoto’s heritage, the city officials developed programs that encourage people to wear kimonos more often. Many temples, museums, transportation methods such as the subway, now offer discounts to [men] and women wearing kimonos. Restaurants are now doing the same. And for not only residents as well. Tourists are encouraged to rent (or buy) kimonos to wear and receive the same discounts.

Renting a kimono in Kyoto is pretty easy to do, here is a listing of a few spots that rent them. Above and beyond the discounts you’ll get while wearing one, they make beautiful photos!

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Girls in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto

Girls in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto, photo credit: Mr. Misadventures

Every time I saw people wearing kimonos, I could not help but to stop and stare (and photograph). These are truly mobile works of art. For a little more reading on the art of it all, here is a great slideshow from the New York Times and an article on one of the master artists from the Washington Post, I encourage you to check them out.

Even the very “simplistic” kimonos worn by the priests were beautiful in their austerity.

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Priest in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto

Of course, as with anything, the higher up the food chain (even the religious one) the “uniform” becomes a little fancier.

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Priest in Kimono at a Temple in Kyoto

But one thing is for sure, the “selfie” is a global phenomenon, especially when you are wearing a kimono!

Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Couple in Kimonos at a Temple in Kyoto

If you are visiting Kyoto and want to learn more about the history of the kimono, visit the Kyoto Museum of Traditional Crafts where you learn about the different types of kimonos, the dyeing techniques, and the painting styles. You can also try your hand in dying one yourself at Marumasu Nishimuraya (I didn’t get to do this and want to next time!).

Also, if you visit and are interested in buying a kimono, I found this great post from a local Kyoto blogger on where to go.

Looking for some spots to wear your kimono in Kyoto? How about Fushimi Inari Shrine, Kiyomizu-dera Temple, or the Nishiki Market? Not only in Kyoto, but in Osaka or Tokyo as well. In spots like Osaka’s Kuromon-Ichiba Market, you’d fit right in!

How about you? Have you ever seen a kimono in person? 

For a visual summary of this post, check out my kimonos in Kyoto web story!

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Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture
Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture Wearing a Kimono in Kyoto: Kyoto's Kimono Culture

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Sarah | Travel for a Living

Saturday 15th of February 2020

Kimonos look so beautiful. I’ve never been to Japan, but I’d love to visit.

Mayi

Sunday 9th of February 2020

I love kimonos and yukukas. Although I have never worn a kimono, I have worn yukatas several times. I love the patterns and texture of the kimono. I particularly love the wedding kimonos: the white version simple yet elegant and the red and vibrant ones.

Francesca

Saturday 8th of February 2020

Kimonos are so beautiful and it looks like such a special honour to wear one!

Josy A

Saturday 8th of February 2020

I love seeing all the kimono in Kyoto and Nara. If you ever have the chance, if you visit Japan in January, on Seijin-no-hi (Coming of Age Day, this year January 13th) Everyone that turned 20 within the previous year dresses up in beeeautiful kimono. I have never seen so many stunning works of art on one day. I think you would love it. <3

Patti

Saturday 8th of February 2020

OMG This is soooo cool! I've always wanted to wear a kimono in Japan. But I didn't know that it was offered as a Gov't incentive to keep the tradition alive. That is really cool. What a clever idea. They are so so beautiful!